Starting a business when still empoyed

Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 07:28 Written by Ed Beckmann Tuesday, 6 November 2012 11:03

Starting a Business

With a perceived lack of available finance and business funding, there is a growing trend in people starting up a new business when they are still in employment. This strategy reduces the pressure to succeed quickly, engage in large marketing campaigns and raise enough finance to keep you going whilst the you gradually win customers. Unless a very big launch into the market is crucial, removing all of the pressures above will enable you to focus on doing every step well, and will make you appear far less anxious when dealing with customers.

Although you will lose some of your leisure time, the contrast between the day job and your own business often gives that extra injection of energy that you need.

Here are some quotes from the Guardian Small Business Network, which offer a live Q & A session from 1pm to 3pm on Tuesday 6 November.




Guardian Small Business Network logo

Recent research from Sage found that one in four people in the UK want to start their own business. But starting from scratch is never easy and to limit risk many people remain in employment to see them through the early days.

There are plenty of things to mull over if you want to take this approach. I’m sure you’ll agree that working full-time is tiring in itself, and you may well end up exhausted while trying to juggle everything. How are you going to organise your time to allow you to concentrate on developing your business idea?

You might also want to think about what you are going to do next. Will you build enough cash reserves from the income your startup creates to sustain you, when and if you decide to leave your job? Then there’s the question of how honest you should you be with your current employer about your extracurricular pursuits. Perhaps, if you’re lucky, you could turn them into your first paying customer, or even bring them on board as a partner. However, be aware that working on your business during company time is unlikely to go down well.


Emily Wight

guardian.co.uk, Friday 5 October 2012 17.45 BST

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Rules for Selling Online

Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 07:28 Written by Ed Beckmann Monday, 5 November 2012 10:46

Internet Sales

As we lead up to the festive season a lot of people will be buying and selling online.

If your business relies on internet sales, or (selling online) then you need to know about website compliance – distance selling regulations that will apply to you. There are loads of guides to do with website marketing and how to sell online, but it is well worth reading a good guide on how to comply with the rules and regulations that protect people who buy online.

Online Selling Rules

Items bought via your online shop will be subject to the Distance Selling Regulations, and there is a lot of information in the Distance Selling Hub run by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) in the UK. The five key principles below are taken from the OFT website and if you want to find out if you are doing the right thing, click our links and go straight to the web compliance tips on their website.

We will add more posts when they issue more guidance on internet sales or internet rules and laws.


Excerpt from the OFT site:


Five of the simplest ways to make your website more compliant with distance selling regulations are by doing the following:


Providing a full geographic address

Providing a proper email contact address
Flagging up hidden or unexpected charges early in the buying process

Being clear and open about cancellation rights

Providing a full refund plus refund of delivery charges when things go wrong

Click here for more information on how to make sure your website is clear and accurate


As you can see – straightforward, practical and useful reminders. Do please google+ or rccommend this page using the links below to share it with your contacts.

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Change the clock – change your routine

Last Updated on Thursday, 28 August 2014 07:28 Written by Ed Beckmann Tuesday, 30 October 2012 05:10

Picture your ideal working hours and try to introduce them

The Working Hours clock from BVD Design

Because the clocks changed in the UK last weekend I have started winter “split shift” system.

Using the Clock changes to your advantage

If, like me, you find the darker evenings and daylight savings time (DST) takes away your leisure or exercise time in the winter, think about how to split up your working day.

The concept of split shift working

The concept is simple and very common many workplaces – do your day’s work in several chunks, rather than one go with a short meal break. Many people are used to starting early, taking a few hours out mid-morning or mid-afternoon then returning to do more work later. If you are your own boss, it can be very tempting to keep the traditional routine of office hours and more. In winter you can find that sports, gardening or just a walk outside to unwind can all get ignored.

So consider setting yourself a break of several hours in daylight then return to running your business as it starts to get dark. The extra focus when you return means that you can still get things done by a reasonable time, and you will not have missed out on stress-reducing down-time and leisure activities.

What about missing calls or customers?

Of course, the business cannot flourish unless you satisfy your customers. So you will need to make plans for dealing with enquiries etc. But remember, there are other times you may be unobtainable during the day because of meetings etc. and you already manage that. Also, remember that you may actually make yourself more available by being open in some evenings – you know your customer needs so give it some thought.

Employees

The concept of split shifts or different working hours may suit many colleagues or employees, so before making any decisions have a discussion about the whole concept of working hours. As long as everyone is in agreement, most arrangements are possible.


Go on – take a few minutes to consider how you could keep some of your daylight pleasures when the daylight hours are shorter! Some timetables can not be changed, but many can with a bit if thought.

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